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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts and we are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but let me assure you we continue to work with t
? >> the special representative for afghanistan and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts ande are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but l
correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
and pakistan. we must always be on our guard, but now, i am informed that this figure has been significantly reduced. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakens. in afghanistan, british and other forces have driven al qaeda from their bases, and while it is too early to tell for certain, initial evidence shows we have halted the certai suggests we halted the momentum of the talibannsurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighti and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no pper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afgha
on counterterrorism efforts with pakistan, setting up officer training academies for afghan police and security operations in the region. this is an hour. >> prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with the mission i'd like to make a statement on afghanistan. from the outset this government has sought to take a more hard-headed, more security-based approach to our mission. as i said, we're not there to build a perfect democracy. still less a model society. yes, we will help with the establishment of democratic institutions. yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage development. but we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to ensure our own national security by helping the afghans to take control of theirs. this means building up the afghan security forces so we can drawdown british combat forces with the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is particularly poignant today, i believe, mr. speaker, on the eve of the sixth anniversary of 7/7, an attack that was executed by extremi
to reintegrate in those areas. secondly, more broadly, put more pressure on pakistan, the biggest outside government supporter of the taliban. if they were to suddenly decide they wanted to cut a deal, that would put pressure on the taliban. unfortunately, we are not seeing across-the-board big three in all locations, nor we seeing pakistan put pressure on them -- a cross-led dashboard victory -- across-the-board- victory in all locations, nor are we seeing pakistan put pressure on them. we're seeing the taliban lose ground in the south. i suspect part of that is contesting areas that the taliban does -- >> thank you for coming in. the worst drought in decades is forcing thousands of families in east africa to walk for days to find refugee camps. the un says some very young children are dying before they ever get there. rain fell for the past three seasons. people are facing dire shortages of food, shelter, and health services. we are in a kenyan refugee camp, the largest of its kind in this world, for this story. >> day after day, mile after mile, they walked and walked. these are the pe
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
into jens, the best intelligence we've gotten since tora bora that he was in abbottabad pakistan, we acted yuan laal ratly and took h out and appropriately so. we do work through the united nations in a variety of places in order, like on the sanctions regimes, on iran and north korea. but we have, as i said at the outset, really undertake aggressively... you know, the first triple trip obama... president obama tk outside the united states was in april, 2009 was to europe for a set of sum rk teixeiras and then to turkey. and understanding that these rising powers, these relationships are important for problem solving, particularly in a place like the middle east. we have had disagreements with the turks over the last three years. >> rose: what are those disagreements? >> we had a disagreement with the turks over tactics around the iranian sanctions resolution. and they thought... >> rose: this is turkey and brazil together because of their response? >> yes. and we... >> rose: they thought they were doing your bidding, you understand that? >> i understand a lot about it. and... but, in fact
on militants based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them, they have shown that india's largest city is still vulnerable. >> the bbc will be in mumbai with the latest details on the attack. >> it is very important to remember that it is still early in the primary investigation being carried out. given a small scale of the attacks that we have seen, it may be a local were involved. it is still a important to remember that much information has to come out of these investigations and only then are we likely to see a clearer picture. >> mumbai is on alert. there were three toward native blass, after all. what security measures are being taken to prevent more? >> the certainly, the blast took place -- or the news assertive out and the city was put on -- the news sorted out and the city was put on high alert. there is more surveillance of the streets. however, mumbai is showing resilience. they can deal with this and move on. certainly, and today will be no different from mine the other day. -- f
officials, pakistan and afghanistan will be on everybody's mind. delhi is worried about security this is a subject that those two countries have never comprehensively addressed with each other. unless they can reach some accommodation on their conflicting interests and indeed suspicions in afghanistan, there will be no regional compact piece for afghanistan. >> but beyond just afghanistan >>óqptf@& working together and do business together. $1.3 trillion economy is a big market for the utah and there lots of talk about investment opportunities during mrs. clinton's visit. >> you're watching "newsday." still to come on the program, the aid agency that had controversy by handing out less aid in uganda. >> and murdoch and sons prepare to answer questions about phone hacking corruption. we assess the future of news corp. south africans have celebrated former president's nelson mandela 93rd birthday. he spent the day with family in his home village where he was also visited by the president. millions of school children sang him a special birthday song before lessons began. >> smiling
the militants based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind it shows that the largest city is still vulnerable. >> we have been to the site of one of the explosions and this is the report. >> this is one of three locations where explosions have taken place in mumbai. just behind this police cordon, a bus stop where a vehicle packed with explosives was located and detonated. this along with two other blasts in the city took place in peak time in russia. in highly densely populated areas. lots of traffic are around. we are hearing as many injuries. they have been taken to local hospitals. the leaders have been coming to this area and said that the priority is to make sure that the injured were taken care of and treated. this is unclear as to who is behind these attacks exactly what has taken place and whether there is any correlation to those attacks that took place in 2008 and five years ago. >> that the venezuelan president hugo chavez has acknowledge that he will need more treatments for cancer.
that have fallen -- followed the killing of osama bin laden in pakistan and the more recent mumbai attacks that have again refocused indian attention on terrorism. but terrorism is an issue which is not exactly an issue of full convergence between the u.s. and india. there are differences between the countries. when hillary clinton discusses this issue with her indian counterpart, there will certainly be differences that will need to be sorted out. >> very briefly, tell us how america's approach to india changed with the rise of china. this is something you've written about. >> china is an important factor, but not one that is publicly discussed. but it is a subtext in the u.s.- india relationship. china becomes more and more assertive as it picks territorial fights with india and its other neighbors, and also begins to exert its influence in the south china sea, claiming the south china sea to be part of its historical borders and thereby infringing on u.s. interests in that seat. there is great room for u.s. and indian collaboration in insuring peace, stability, and more in asia. >> we w
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
. he says the u.s. has identified 10 to 20 key al qaeda leaders whom he says are in pakistan, yemen and other areas. >>> al qaeda is making a comeback in afghanistan. u.s. commanders are seeing a sudden resurgence just as american troops are getting ready to leave. cnn's nick payton walsh joined an army patrol on the hunt. >> reporter: almost a decade in the hunt for al qaeda in one part of eastern afghanistan looks like this. americans pushing the afghans to the front, taking the high ground in hills impossible to police. the pressure for less americans here is extreme, but the afghans only mustered five men for this patrol. >> it has to be five to seven round bursts and go. >> reporter: and despite this training, policing the local villages, let alone taking on the terrorist network that america came here to eradicate. it is here that afghanistan's future looks like its past. american control does not extend up to this valley and high on the ridgelines, they found safe havens for al qaeda. they have revealed to cnn they located here al qaeda fighters using the secluded alpine vill
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
, pakistan or egypt. and the two questions that i have, how many connections have there been -- convictions have there been over the last several years, do you have any -- and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? generally, when there's a problem, members go to the embassy, they advocate it. how many times has the american embassy participate and been involved in any different cases? >> thank you very much, mr. wolf. there have been, in the 50 cases i was involved with personally, there were two investigations, neither investigation resulted in any legal process, so there are no convictions, um, resulting as of, as of complaints to the effective kidnappings, forced marriages and forced converses of coptic christian women. to my knowledge, also, and according to my research the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one last thing, mr. chairman. as you have this record, i urge you to send it to leon panetta. our military has a very good relationship, in fact, as i think our military has a better relationship and more cl
and defended as to how prudently weaver held in pakistan. the're building it to floods in the valley. we put in billions of dollars. they have objective measurements should the favorability is in the single digits. that is pretty disgusting when you're spending that kind of money trying to help people. i understand there's no objective standard in yemen. it to be impossible to measure it on an objective basis. maybe from into total testimony can you give me your description? >> thank you. in general, the experience is that the perception of american aid is positive. the way that i can help illustrate sex most poignantly is that we brand our assistance in most cases the route the country. it is clear. it is clear hewitt is coming from. this is important in terms of the messaging. it also means we're able to operate on our partners openly by the american people. this is well-received. it is done safely throughout the country. >> what would be your gut feeling if they did some standard. what percentage of people do you think would respond that they were favorable tax >> i really cannot speculat
or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going to run their government. this is something you can't avoid. when the figures for you don't put other dictators in you can put into place the basic institutions and procedures. >> host: he turned back from these issues in the news of the intellectual argument that the core of your book which is a very cha
or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way to control, to change those who are going to run their governments. and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators fall, you have put in place the basic institutions and procedures for getting responsive gov
, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard to find anybody, -- >> guest: that is true. but good governance brings us back to something like democratization. something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture that will sort of be a jerk to interview. but ill be something that people have a way to control and to change those are going to run their government. and this is something you can't avoid when the dictators flow, you don't put on the dictators
, whether with iraq or iraq today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to sell the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it's going to be something where the people will have a way to control, change those who are going to run their government, and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators form and dictatorships are in p
in afghanistan, pakistan, yemen. and i urge this subcommittee to let somalia to guide your policy on somalia rather than any other country. >> i echo my colleagues sentiments. to answer your question, i think we need to look at not only the threat that emanates from there, which does affect our way of life, the freedoms that we enjoy, commerce, threats to navigation, the very real threat irrespective of how are when they got there, the fact that al shabaab has been possible to other terrorist movements and extremist groups allowing them to operate in somalia creating a hodgepodge of characters gathered there, introducing them to reach other, including introducing them to the 30 americans with european and australian passports that of now gone through. for all of those reasons, we need to be concerned. we need to be concerned because we take for granted the areas in somalia and it is not the chaos that we imagine, but south central areas mainly where the conflict is. as the ambassador said earlier, it has been one of the most democratic states in the region. they have its problems, some of wh
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
in afghanistan and pakistan. not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the entity described in subsection 8, shall submit to the president and the congress, a report. sense of congress, it is the sense of congress that the entity should be modeled on the iraq study group. section 8127, not more than $200 million may be expended -- the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise. mr. carter: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 31 printed in the congressional record offered by mr. carter of texas. strike lines 6 through 9 relating to military musical units. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized for five minutes. mr. carter: i rise to address an issue i think is very important to the patriotic men and women who fight and defend our country. representative mccollum, in good graces, asked that we restrict the military band funding by $120 million and in an attempt to help with the savings. but the congressional budget office has informed us that this reduction, this $120 million re
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)